Terri Schlichenmeyer



Recent Stories

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“Ladysitting: My Year with Nana at the End of Her Century” by Lorene Cary

You were their hope for the future. For your elders, your birth represented things they wished would happen but that they’d never know. It was a joy for them to see you come into the world but for you, as in the new book “Ladysitting” by Lorene Cary, it’s harder to see them go.

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“A Craftsman’s Legacy” by Eric Gorges

Necessity is not the mother of invention. Childhood. There you are: that’s the mother of invention. When you were a kid, if you didn’t have something and you didn’t have the funds to buy it, you cobbled it together from whatever you could find – and it worked. But have you lost that initiative, the imagination, the joy in creating? As in “A Craftsman’s Legacy” by Eric Gorges, do you need to return to working with your hands?

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“The Code of the Righteous Warrior” by Rev. Dr. Alyn E. Waller

These days, you just don’t know what to expect. Things used to be laid out nice and easy: a real man took care of business, he settled disagreements with his fists, and he was head of his household. But it’s a new world now with new expectations, and in “The Code of the Righteous Warrior” by Rev. Dr. Alyn E. Waller, you’ll know how to get through it.

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“Becoming a Veterinarian” by Boris Kachka

The minute the doctor walked into the room, you felt a sense of relief. Soon, the pain will be gone and you might finally get some rest. You could even have a name for the illness causing all these problems. Soon, your ailing pet will feel better, life will return to normal and in “Becoming a Veterinarian” by Boris Kachka, you’ll see what goes into the making of an animal doctor.

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“Odd Partners: An Anthology,” edited by Anne Perry

You’ll freely admit it: you can’t do it alone. Every important thing you do takes two. Another opinion, a confirmation that you’re right, an extra set of hands, another pair of eyes, everything works better when you’ve got help. It takes a pair to make progress, a duo to do well, and in the new anthology, “Odd Partners: An Anthology,” edited by Anne Perry, it takes two to murder.

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“Queen Bey: A Celebration of the Power and Creativity of Beyoncé Knowles-Carter,” edited by Veronica Chambers

You were Crazy in Love. It happened the first time you heard Beyoncé Knowles, before she won a Grammy, before she added to her life with a man and motherhood. It happened the first time you saw her, a skinny child with a

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“Sisters” by Jeanette Winter

You caught it! The ball was thrown very high – so high that you lost it in the sky for a minute – and you weren’t sure how you’d do it, but your hands were out and you caught it. Just. Like. That. Some balls are meant to be thrown or batted, while some are meant to bounce. In the new book “Sisters” by Jeanette Winter, you’ll learn about two girls who don’t just hit a ball, they smash it.

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“Black is the Body: Stories From My Grandmother’s Time, My Mother’s Time, and Mine” by Emily Bernard

Your mother dealt with things you can’t imagine. It was a different time when she was your age, with societal issues you’d never tolerate and rules you wouldn’t abide. Same with your grandma: scrapbooks, history books and museums are the only places you’ll see what she lived. So what will your children know?

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“I’m Not Really a Waitress” by Suzi Weiss-Fischmann

You’d get it right someday. At about the second week of starting a business, that may’ve been your thought. Rookie mistakes had been made, long nights were spent, but you still had confidence to hang in there. Says Suzi Weiss-Fischmann in “I’m Not Really a Waitress,” success takes time and lots of learning.

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“You Can’t Go Wrong Doing Right: How a Child of Poverty Rose to the White House and Helped Change the World” by Robert J. Brown

Do unto others. Three words that are a shorthand reminder to be nice and treat people in the manner that you’d want to be treated. Do unto others and make life smoother. Be good, and be of service because, as Robert J. Brown reminds readers, “You Can’t Do Wrong Doing Right.”

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