Trump says 'we're all to blame' for poor US-Russia relationship, Putin denies interference

CNN/Stylemagazine.com Newswire | 7/16/2018, 11:26 a.m.
US President Donald Trump said Monday he holds both the United States and Russia responsible for the breakdown in the ...
President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin

The two men walked into the palace's Gothic Hall together, offering brief remarks and shaking hands for the cameras before the two men were left alone -- save for a pair of interpreters -- for the first meeting of the day.

Trump and Putin had set aside 90 minutes of solo time -- just as Trump did with Kim Jong Un last month. But the two men spilled into overtime, inviting reporters for the start of their expanded bilateral meeting with top aides 2 hours and 11 minutes after their one-on-one meeting began. Trump was joined by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, national security adviser John Bolton, White House chief of staff John Kelly, Fiona Hill, the top Russia expert at the National Security Council, and interpreter Marina Gross.

The lengthy tête-à-tête made Trump's remarks ahead of the meeting all the more notable -- and concerning to some.

US officials have stressed the path to improving US-Russia ties runs through a clear-eyed understanding of Russian aggression and the root causes of discord in the relationship, but Trump is signaling a different course. He is holding previous US administrations and the Justice Department's investigation stemming from Russian meddling in the 2016 election responsible.

"Our relationship with Russia has NEVER been worse thanks to many years of U.S. foolishness and stupidity and now, the Rigged Witch Hunt!" Trump tweeted Monday morning ahead of the summit.

Trump was eager to have time alone with Putin to better personally assess him and develop a personal relationship, according to a US official, but he has also expressed anger at leaks from his meetings with foreign leaders and told aides he wanted to ensure his sensitive discussions with Putin remained secret.

The official also said that Trump doesn't want aides -- who may take a harder line on Russia -- undercutting or interrupting him during his talks with Putin.

Just days earlier, Trump pointed to the "pure stupidity" and a "political problem" in the United States for making it "very hard to do something with Russia."

"Anything you do, it's always going to be, 'Oh, Russia, he loves Russia,' " Trump said during a joint news conference with his British counterpart.

Trump's Monday morning tweet and his words and actions in the last week have only amplified concerns about his approach to Russia among US allies and lawmakers of both parties in Washington. During his swing through Brussels and the United Kingdom, Trump has repeatedly criticized US allies, called the European Union a "foe" and criticized the Obama administration rather than Russia in the wake of the Justice Department's indictment of 12 Russian agents who allegedly worked to hack Democrats' emails and computer networks during the 2016 election.

Ahead of his meeting with Putin -- who is alleged to be behind the assassination of journalists and political dissidents -- the US President also lashed out again at the news media on Sunday by branding journalists "the enemy of the people."