NBA Super Teams: The Beginning and The End

Brian Barefield | 6/9/2017, 11:34 a.m.
As I prepare myself to watch game three of the 2017 NBA Finals featuring the two best teams in the ...

As I prepare myself to watch game three of the 2017 NBA Finals featuring the two best teams in the league, it got me to thinking about the NBA as a whole and why there are only two “Super Teams.” Which by the way get used to seeing the Cleveland Cavaliers and Golden State Warriors for at least the next 3 years (I will explain that shortly). But as we approach the upcoming game with the bevy of extraordinary talent that will be on the floor (LeBron James, Kevin Durant, Steph Curry, Kyrie Irving, etc.), ask yourself this question, is there enough talent in the league left to form another “Super Team?”

Golden State Warriors

Golden State Warriors

Super Teams, in my opinion, are those organizations with at least three players on them that are considered superstars in the NBA currently. They shine with skill and display the right type of chemistry on the court such as ball movement so that every superstar receives sufficient ball-to-hand contact during games. Communication is key for these guys to have an effective defense. Each star must be willing to sacrifice part of their own strengths for the greater good of the overall team. As we look through the current rosters of the other 28 teams and the notable free agents that will be available in the next two years, can we see any scenarios that fit the criteria we spoke of earlier? Is there any combination that will honestly give the Cavs or Warriors (given if the current rosters of superstars remain with the team) any challenge? The answer is simple and a resounding … No!

Los Angeles Clippers

Los Angeles Clippers

If you look at the players available once this season ends such as Gordon Hayward, Paul Millsap, Blake Griffin, Chris Paul, Kyle Lowry, etc. None of them can go to a team and make them a super team. Now they can go and help a team become better but they can’t make a team super. Not in the sense where they are ready to compete for a championship the day they arrive. Part of the problem is there are no current teams constructed with two legitimate superstars. Most of the ones who need the help have a superstar and a really good player. Let me give you a couple of examples. Take the Houston Rockets, the home team. James Harden is a superstar and 2017 MVP finalist. He is an elite talent that is a top five player in the league, no doubt. Looking over the Rockets roster where is another player that can support the same status that Harden brings? Not one can be found. Now don’t get me wrong. The Rockets have some very good and gifted players but not one can truly be considered a superstar when reviewing the definition of the word. Let’s say the Los Angeles Clippers Point Forward Blake Griffin decides he wants to come to Houston to play with Harden and the rest of the Rockets that would, of course, propel the Rockets to have more “W’s” in the win column and a better seeding in the West. That has been proven with the third place finish they racked up this past season behind the San Antonio Spurs (2) and Golden State Warriors (1). So, a player like Griffin pushes them past the Spurs for the number two seed, but not to a number one if the Warriors team stays intact the way it is now. That gives the Rockets two superstars while the Warriors would still have four.